buzzdatablog

BuzzData blog:

I’ve worked with data throughout my career (possibly for my sins).

I’m not a data scientist, but even before BuzzData,  barely a day went by where an Excel spreadsheet or CSV file didn’t end up in my inbox. Sales forecasts, cost-benefit analyses, market research, product test results, benchmarks…

Is this intended as a universal ETL? I’m not sure. It would be nice though. We could certainly use something like that. 

This is a follow-up, written by me (full disclosure) to the  recent New York Times Borderlines Opinionator post, The First Google Maps War.

On the hazards of crowd-sourced reference tools

This is problematic, whether open data e.g. OpenStreetMap, or not e.g. Google Maps with new commercial rate charge for high API usage.

Either OpenStreetMap or Google Maps is probably just fine for FourSquare users. But the same isn’t true for setting territorial boundaries in Asia, or South America. Nor for disputed street names in a small Vermont town, either.

mcgrawhillfinancial

U.S. Home Prices Drop Again: S&P Case-Shiller Housing Index

According to Standard & Poor’s, and Case-Shiller too (their housing market research partner), U.S. housing market prices are down for the third straight month, based on data through November 2011. The complete PDF with details of the latest release, hot off the press as of today 31 January 2012, is now available on the Housing Views website.

For more details on the housing market, past and future, see the Housing Views website, on WordPress, not the corporate pay wall site. It includes Professor Shiller’s monthly updates about the U.S. housing market, and on going commentary from S&P economists. I like it. The charts and graphs gallery will no doubt be of interest to fans of well, charts and graphs.

U.S. Residential Mortgage Performance Index

Earlier this month, S&P and Case-Shiller reported that cumulative default fates, oops, I meant rates(!) are leveling off, but later-vintage loans still face a long road ahead.

via McGraw-Hill Companies (on tumblr):

Cumulative default rates among U.S. residential mortgage loans continued to level off in third-quarter 2011, furthering improvements that began at the start of the year. Loans that were originated in 2006 and 2007 still have the highest default rates, but performance within these two vintages has improved in recent months. Given myriad factors, however, it’s still too soon to accurately assess whether these trends will continue. Read more.

nosql

According to Tableau Software

Now that the Best of 2011 lists are winding down, let the Exciting Predictions for 2012 commence!

This is a list of “Top Ten Business Intelligence Trends for 2012”, according to Tableau Software, via NoSQL tumblr.

nosql:

  1. Big data gets even bigger
  2. Self-reliance is the new self-service
  3. The “Consumerization of Enterprise Software accelerates”
  4. Mobile BI goes mainstream
  5. Some companies start to get comfortable with social BI
  6. Companies explore the BI cloud
  7. Most jobs will require analytical skills… leading to talent shortages
  8. BI projects flourish under aligned IT & business
  9. Interactive data visualization becomes a requirement
  10. Hadoop gathers momentum — unstructured data isn’t going anywhere.

It sounds like companies will have to discover the fountain of money to be able to accomplish 2, 6, and 8 within a year.

Read More

Agreed.

Discovery of the Fountain of Money wouldn’t be enough to create a situation where something like say, a Data Warehouse, would flourish. “Aligned IT and business” is elusive, rumored, but rarely sighted.

Call me cynical. I did giggle though.

See above, for truth.
See below, for Fox.
The point is not whether the employment data is flawed. The official source is the U.S. Department of Labor, as represented above. That is primary data. Fox must either report it as released by the government of the country in which Fox operates and holds allegiance to, OR, present a credible investigative analysis as to why the data is incorrect.
Falsifying a chart and distorting the time series data is NOT journalism. And I don’t want to hear that “only idiots watch Fox” nor “no one takes Fox seriously”. It has news programs. It is not “The Satire and Parody Network”. Though it should be, with repeated incidents like this. 
(via Today In Dishonest Fox News Charts)

See above, for truth.

See below, for Fox.

The point is not whether the employment data is flawed. The official source is the U.S. Department of Labor, as represented above. That is primary data. Fox must either report it as released by the government of the country in which Fox operates and holds allegiance to, OR, present a credible investigative analysis as to why the data is incorrect.

Falsifying a chart and distorting the time series data is NOT journalism. And I don’t want to hear that “only idiots watch Fox” nor “no one takes Fox seriously”. It has news programs. It is not “The Satire and Parody Network”. Though it should be, with repeated incidents like this. 

(via Today In Dishonest Fox News Charts)

image

curiositycounts
curiositycounts:

A global view of the housing bubble

Interesting how housing prices in Germany, Sweden and Switzerlard were nearly static for forty consecutive years. Similarly interesting is that housing prices in German and Japan have steadily decreased, though to different degrees, and for different reasons, over the past 10 years.
I think. It isn’t easy for to see the details on this chart. Barry Ritholtz made the original post, on his blog on 11 November 2011. The image links through so the curious may have a chance to view in more detail, with a no doubt better analysis than my scant observations. 
*Unfortunate that Greece and Portugal were not included. Italy is present, and showed admirable resistance to housing bubble mania. Although rates of ownership of private property might be lower in Italy. I know that is the case for Switzerland.

curiositycounts:

global view of the housing bubble

Interesting how housing prices in Germany, Sweden and Switzerlard were nearly static for forty consecutive years. Similarly interesting is that housing prices in German and Japan have steadily decreased, though to different degrees, and for different reasons, over the past 10 years.

I think. It isn’t easy for to see the details on this chart. Barry Ritholtz made the original post, on his blog on 11 November 2011. The image links through so the curious may have a chance to view in more detail, with a no doubt better analysis than my scant observations. 

*Unfortunate that Greece and Portugal were not included. Italy is present, and showed admirable resistance to housing bubble mania. Although rates of ownership of private property might be lower in Italy. I know that is the case for Switzerland.